Academic Calendar 2007 (new)» UNDERGRADUATE COURSE INFORMATION» Anthropology
print preview

Anthropology

Anthropology Courses
 
025F/G026F/G027a/b100112201F/G202F/G
203F/G211F/G212F/G216F/G217F/G218F/G219F/G
220E222F/G226a/b227E228F/G229F/G230F/G
231F/G232F/G233F/G234F/G235a/b236a/b237a/b
243F/G245F/G247a/b248a/b249F/G255E260F/G
262F/G264F/G281F/G282F/G283F/G290F/G301E
304F/G305F/G306F/G307a308F/G309F/G310a/b
317F/G320325F/G326F/G327E332F/G333F/G
334F/G335F/G336F/G337F/G338F/G341F/G342a/b
349F/G400E411F/G412F/G420a/b430F/G431F/G

Anthropology 025F/G, Introduction to Sociocultural Anthropology
Description: An introduction to the basic concepts used in the anthropological study of non-Western social and cultural institutions that focuses on the unity and diversity of human experience. Topics include: kinship, economics, politics, religion, and the present-day conditions of indigenous societies. The ethnography of various peoples is discussed.
Antirequisite(s): Anthropology 020E.
3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 026F/G, Introduction to Biological Anthropology and Archaeology
Description: An introduction to aspects of biological anthropology and archaeology which help us to understand the place of humankind in nature. Topics to be covered include heredity, human evolution and variability, archaeological method, the development of culture, the domestication of plants and animals, and the rise of civilization and the state.
Antirequisite(s): Anthropology 020E.
3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 027a/b, Introduction to Linguistics
Description: Introduction to basic concepts and methods of modern linguistics. Topics include articulatory and acoustic phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics. This course is a prerequisite for subsequent linguistics courses in the Department of Anthropology and/or the Linguistics program.
Antirequisite(s): Linguistics 288a/b.
3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 100, Archaeology and World Prehistory
Description: The field of archaeology, with emphasis on the major discoveries of the discipline. Topics include the evolution of humans, their spread throughout the world, the origins of agriculture, urbanization, and the development of early civilizations. Major archaeological sites like Olduvai Gorge, Stonehenge, Giza, Ur and Teotihuacan will be discussed.
3 hours, 1.0 course.
back to top

Anthropology 112, Iroquoian Language and Culture
Description: In this course the student will learn the basics of a particular North American aboriginal language (Mohawk) and will examine the relationships of that language to various culturally relevant concepts.
Antirequisite(s): First Nations Studies 112.
Prerequisite(s): Any Arts or Social Science 1.0 or 0.5 Essay course.
3 hours, 1.0 course.
back to top

Anthropology 201F/G, The Anthropology of Towns and Cities
Description: An ethnographic approach to towns and cities examining small and large urban and peri-urban sites as complex cultural and social systems. Urban anthropological methods and approaches to homelessness, poverty and inequality, health and gender, consumption and globalization, among others, will be explored from a critical cross-cultural perspective.
Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 1.0 or 0.5 Essay course.
3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 202F/G, Sex, Sexuality and Desire: Cross-Cultural Explorations of Queer Lives
Description: Using ethnography to challenge the heteronormative assumption, this course explores sexual and erotic diversity from a critical cross cultural perspective, examining local expressions and practices of sexuality and desire, as well as the transnational flow of queer culture as an aspect of global social and political change.
Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 1.0 or 0.5 Essay course.
3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 203F/G, Indigenous Peoples, Globalization and the Environment
Description: An examination of natural resource development emphasizing the interplay between indigenous people, the state and transnational developers. Topics include: environmentalism and livelihood; land rights; corporate power and state policies; common property and community-based resource management; NGOs in environmental politics; sustainability and the greening of development.
Antirequisite(s): First Nations Studies 203F/G
Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 1.0 or 0.5 Essay course.
3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 211F/G, Cultures of the Caribbean
Description: An introduction to the Caribbean and circum- Caribbean, emphasizing religion, aesthetic styles, current political processes, and relationships of the region and its peoples to Canada.
Antirequisite(s): First Nations Studies 211F/G.
Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 1.0 or 0.5 Essay course.
3 hours, 0.5 course.
Usually only two of Anthropology 211F/G, Anthropology 212F/G, Anthropology 216F/G, Anthropology 217F/G, Anthropology 218F/G, Anthropology 219F/G will be offered in any given year.
back to top

Anthropology 212F/G, Cultures of the Pacific
Description: The cultures of Polynesia, Micronesia and Melanesia with an emphasis on indigenous social structures. Other topics include ecology and economy, male-female relations, ritual and cosmology, hierarchical and egalitarian political systems, Pacific history, and contemporary political and economic issues.
Antirequisite(s): First Nations Studies 212F/G
Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 1.0 or 0.5 Essay course.
3 hours, 0.5 course.
Usually only two of Anthropology 211F/G, Anthropology 212F/G, Anthropology 216F/G, Anthropology 217F/G, Anthropology 218F/G, Anthropology 219F/G will be offered in any given year.
back to top

Anthropology 216F/G, Cultures of Latin America
Description: The cultural history of Latin American societies. Topics include the historical formation of indigenous communities, and a wide variety of contemporary social problems in Latin America.
Antirequisite(s): First Nations Studies 216F/G.
Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 1.0 or 0.5 Essay course.
3 hours, 0.5 course.
Usually only two of Anthropology 211F/G, Anthropology 212F/G, Anthropology 216F/G, Anthropology 217F/G, Anthropology 218F/G, Anthropology 219F/G will be offered in any given year.
back to top

Anthropology 217F/G, First Nations Traditional Cultures of Canada.
Description: Cultural and linguistic areas of Canada, subsistence patterns, social and political organization, religion, ethnohistory of the fur trade and Metis, treaties, accessing First Nations viewpoints.
Antirequisite(s): The former Anthropology 214F/G or First Nations Studies 217F/G.
Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 1.0 or 0.5 Essay course.
3 lecture/seminar hours, 0.5 course.
Usually only two of Anthropology 211F/G, Anthropology 212F/G, Anthropology 216F/G, Anthropology 217F/G, Anthropology 218F/G, Anthropology 219F/G will be offered in any given year.
back to top

Anthropology 218F/G, Contemporary First Nations Issues in Canada.
Description: Education, land claims, sovereignty, social justice, hunting and fishing rights, co-management of resources, spirituality, pow-wows, oral history, language maintenance; media representation, cross-cultural mis-communication, Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples.
Antirequisite(s): The former Anthropology 214F/G or First Nations Studies 218F/G.
Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 1.0 or 0.5 Essay course.
3 lecture/seminar hours, 0.5 course.
Usually only two of Anthropology 211F/G, Anthropology 212F/G, Anthropology 216F/G, Anthropology 217F/G, Anthropology 218F/G, Anthropology 219F/G will be offered in any given year.
back to top

Anthropology 219F/G, Cultures of Middle East
Description: A critical examination of approaches that tend to homogenize and dehistoricize Middle Eastern peoples. The course provides an historical overview that reveals regional heterogeneity, and shifts in peoples, powers and borders. Due to the immensity and complexity of the region, the thematic focus will change regularly.
Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 1.0 or 0.5 Essay course.
3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.
Usually only two of Anthropology 211F/G, Anthropology 212F/G, Anthropology 216F/G, Anthropology 217F/G, Anthropology 218F/G, Anthropology 219F/G will be offered in any given year.
back to top

Anthropology 220E, Iroquoian Perspective and Tradition
Description: A continuation of Iroquoian language acquisition (Mohawk) utilizing the mythology, legends, and ceremonial texts as the basis for examining a unique world view of the Iroquoian people and its continuation and survival in contemporary Iroquoian culture.
Antirequisite(s): First Nations Studies 220E.
Prerequisite(s): First Nations Studies 020E or Anthropology / First Nations Studies 112, or equivalent introductory Mohawk language course.
3 lecture hours, 1 laboratory hour, 1.0 course.
back to top

Anthropology 222F/G, The Foundations of Anthropology
Description: An overview of socio-cultural theory accomplished through the reading of a number of anthropological classics. Each will be examined critically against the background of major theoretical developments in Anthropology from the late nineteenth century to the 1960s.
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 020E or 025F/G.
3 hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 226a/b, Biological Anthropology
Description: A survey of the major areas of biological anthropology, including heredity, paleo-anthropology, human adaptability and variability, and growth and development.
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 020E, or 025F/G and 026F/G.
3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 227E, Special Topics in Anthropology
Description: Special topics of current interest in Anthropology. List of special topics available in the Anthropology Department.
Prerequisite(s): Any first year Arts or Social Science 1.0 or 0.5 Essay course.
3 lecture hours, 1.0 course.
back to top

Anthropology 228F/G, Special Topics in Anthropology.
Description: Special topics of current interest in Anthropology. List of special topics may be available in the Department.
Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 1.0 or 0.5 Essay course.
3 lecture/seminar hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 229F/G, Principles of Archaeology
Description: This course provides an overview of the goals, theory and analytical methods of archaeology as practised by anthropologists. The course serves to provide a basic appreciation of how one is able to go from the material remains of past peoples to statements about the nature of their cultural systems, and also, how archaeologists are uniquely poised to address certain general questions of concern to all anthropologists.
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 020E or 025F/G and 026F/G.
3 hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 230F/G, Arctic Archaeology
Description: An overview and critical evaluation of reconstructions of past ways of life in the Arctic. The course will introduce prehistoric cultures as archaeologically defined and examine the use of ethnography in archaeological interpretation, the role of cultural contact in culture change, and the use of archaeology in constructing contemporary identity.
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 026F/G.
3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 231F/G, Archaeology of North America
Description: An overview of the archaeology of native peoples north of Mexico. Topics include the evolution of Plains bison hunting, the origins of agriculture and Pueblo societies in the Southwest, the development of social complexity amongst the mound builders of the Mississippi Valley, and the colonization of the High Arctic.
Antirequisite(s): First Nations Studies 231F/G.
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 020E or 025F/G and 026F/G.
3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 232F/G, Prehistoric Civilizations of Mesoamerica
Description: The prehistoric societies of Mexico and Central America. Topics include the entry of humans into the New World and their arrival in Mesoamerica; appearance of agriculture and settled village life; evolution of cities and civilizations; development of historic Aztec and Maya societies; effect of the Spanish Conquest.
Antirequisite(s): First Nations Studies 232F/G.
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 020E or 025F/G and 026F/G or Anthropology 100 or First Nations Studies 020E.
3 hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 233F/G, Archaeology of Ontario and the Great Lakes
Description: The prehistoric societies of Ontario and surrounding areas. Topics include the entry of humans into the New World and their arrival in Ontario; development of agriculture; appearance of historic period societies such as the Huron, Neutral and Ojibwa; impact of European settlement and economic systems on native societies.
Antirequisite(s): First Nations Studies 233F/G.
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 020E or 025F/G and 026F/G or Anthropology 100 or First Nations Studies 020E.
3 hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 234F/G, Andean Prehistory
Description: This course will focus primarily on the prehistory of the Peruvian Andes and Coast, with some overlap into Ecuador, Bolivia, Chile and Amazonia. We will study the area's archaeological record in some detail, touching on a variety of themes that are of general archaeological interest, e.g. agricultural origins, trade, the rise of complex societies, the role of religious ideology, and the interpretation of archaeological evidence.
Antirequisite(s): First Nations Studies 234F/G.
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 020E or 025F/G and 026F/G or Anthropology 100 or First Nations Studies 020E.
3 hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 235a/b, Individuation in Forensic Science
Description: Recovering remains and identifying victims and perpetrators of crimes is at the core of forensic science. This course details methods used in crime scene analysis using a case study format. Topics include: archaeology, entomology, vital statistics (i.e., age, sex, stature, race) of skeletons, fingerprinting, and DNA (nuclear and mitochondrial).
Prerequisite(s): A first year Social Science, Health Sciences, or Science course.
3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 236a/b, Human Aging: Bioanthropological Perspectives
Description: This course examines biological changes of the human body from birth to old age, using a systems approach to document and evaluate populational patterns of growth and development. It emphasizes methods used in bioarchaeology to estimate chronological age from calcified tissue and problems associated with senescence (i.e., osteoarthritis and osteoporosis).
Prerequisite(s): Any one of the following: Anthropology 020E, 026F/G, Sociology 020, 021, Biology 022, 023, 025, 026, 090b, Health Sciences 022.
3 lecture hours, 0.5 course
back to top

Anthropology 237a/b, Field Techniques in Linguistics
Description: The phonological and lexical-grammatical systems of a designated language are studied. Selected aspects of the language are analyzed in terms of current problems in linguistic theory.
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 027a/b or Linguistics 288a/b.
3 hours, 0.5 course.
Limited Enrolment
back to top

Anthropology 243F/G, Applied Linguistics
Description: A review of applications of linguistic theory, with special emphasis on language teaching. Includes the organization and evaluation of language teaching; comparisons of first and second language acquisition in adults and children; the relevance of psycholinguistic and sociolinguistic research to language teaching and learning; theories of communicative competence.
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 027a/b or Linguistics 288a/b.
3 hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 245F/G, Topics in Language and Culture
Description: Culture is investigated using linguistic methods and techniques. Topics include: the analysis of lexical sets, cognitive categories, language as a symbolic communicative process, non-verbal communication, conversational analysis.
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 020E or 025F/G or 027a/b or Linguistics 288a/b.
3 hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 247a/b, Phonological Analysis
Description: An introduction to the analysis of the sound systems of languages. Includes a discussion of the basic units of sound, their patterns of distribution and alternation. Topics to be covered are: articulatory phonetics, acoustic phonetics, distinctive feature theory, the writing of rules to describe phonological patterns. The generative framework will be emphasized.
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 027a/b or Linguistics 288a/b.
3 hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 248a/b, Introduction to Syntax and Semantics
Description: An introduction to contemporary generative syntax and semantics: lexical categories, lexical semantics, morphology in relation to syntax, constituency, dependency, grammatical relations, argument structure, sentential semantics focussing especially on the relation between semantic structure and syntactic structure. The primary language discussed will be English but examples will be drawn from other languages where appropriate.
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 027a/b or Linguistics 288a/b.
3 hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 249F/G, Discourse Analysis and Linguistic Pragmatics
Description: Analysis of the contexts in which sentences occur and of the communicative functions they carry. Topics include: theme/rheme, information structure, deixis, presupposition, conversational implicature, speech acts and conversational analysis.
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 027a/b or Linguistics 288a/b.
3 hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 255E, Feminist Perspectives in Anthropology
Description: Critical assessment of feminist theory and methodology for cross-cultural interpretations. Topics include: critical examination of gender, division of labor, power, production and reproduction, ideology, communication, "nature"; controversies over nature/nurture, nature/culture, public/private.
Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 1.0 or 0.5 Essay course.
3 hours, 1.0 course.
back to top

Anthropology 260F/G, "Nature" in the City
Description: This course examines how changing notions of social control, sanitation, property value, class, security, and individual well-being have shaped the social production of green spaces in urban environments. We will also explore how green spaces are experienced by urban inhabitants and influence their imagination of the city.
Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 1.0 or 0.5 Essay course.
3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 262F/G, The Production and Consumption of Global Commodities
Description: This course focuses on communities of commodity producers and consumers in an integrated global political economy. Weekly lectures centre on particular commodities (rubber, gold, sapphires, oil, water, etc.) and on how anthropologists have attempted to study the roots and effects of their production and consumption.
Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 1.0 or 0.5 Essay course.
3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 264F/G, Issues in Primate Conservation
Description: A consideration of conservation issues confronting primatologists, including: conservation assessment, variables for understanding the conservation biology of nonhuman primate populations, biogeographic patterns contributing to declining primate populations, strategies in primate conservation, and how ethnoprimatology the study of interactions between humans and nonhuman primate populations can be useful in primate conservation.
Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 1.0 or 0.5 Essay course.
3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 281F/G, Anthropology of Development
Description: Third World responses to development from an anthropological perspective, with emphasis on the impact of market institutions on indigenous societies. Topics include the impact of aid, wage labor and urbanization on peasant communities; local versus national priorities in development; and risk aversion and technological innovation among small farmers.
Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 1.0 or 0.5 Essay course.
3 hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 282F/G, The Anthropology of Migration
Description: This course will examine human migration from an anthropological perspective that includes a brief historical overview of human mobility, case studies from around the world, and theoretical attempts to explain and predict human migration.
Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 1.0 or 0.5 Essay course.
3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 283F/G, Refugees and the Displaced: An Anthropological Approach to Forced Migration
Description: This course examines populations forcibly uprooted from their original habitats due to armed conflict, famine, environmental disasters and 'development.' It emphasizes the need to examine displacement in specific contexts. Topics include: the impact of displacement on society and culture, 'home' and exile, humanitarian aid, resistance and resilience in host-countries.
Prerequisite(s): Any full or half Social Science essay course and registration in any module in the Faculty of Social Science.
3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 290F/G, Plagues and Peoples
Description: This course introduces students to the study of health and healing from an anthropological perspective. It explores the cultural and social basis of health, disease patterns and healing practices using cross cultural comparison.
Prerequisite(s): Any Arts and Humanities or Social Science 1.0 or 0.5 Essay course.
3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 301E, Concepts of Society and Culture
Description: Provides a comparative view of kinship organization and social stratification in order to examine different models of the relationship between social structure and cultural form.
Prerequisite(s): At least 0.5 from Anthropology 211F/G, 212F/G, (or the former 213F/G or 214F/G), 216F/G, 217F/G, 218F/G, 219F/G or 222F/G and registration in Year 3 or 4 in any module.
3 hours, 1.0 course.
back to top

Anthropology 304F/G, Anthropology of Capitalism
Description: This course examines capitalism from a critical anthropological perspective. Historical and contemporary processes are examined to explore the uneven effects of capitalism in regions far from its genesis. The cultural and political processes underlying contemporary capitalism are also analysed.
Prerequisite(s): Any Social Science 200 level Essay course and third year registration or higher in any Social Science program.
3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 305F/G, History, Territory and the Politics of Identity
Description: This course examines the reconstitution of identities as people reclaim histories and territories, challenging nation-states and traditional identity references. The course examines different situations through case studies in colonial and post-colonial societies. Key issues to be discussed include: memory/history; territory, displacement and deterritorialization; citizenship, nation and the state.
Prerequisite(s): Any Social Science Essay full or half course and 3rd year registration or higher in any program.
3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 306F/G, Ethnohistorical Research in Anthropology
Description: This course provides insight into culture and society based upon evidence from written documents, oral literature, art, film, and material culture within a comparative and cross-cultural framework. Ethnohistorical research brings together an anthropological understanding of social structure, culture and community with an historical understanding of time and change.
Antirequisite(s): First Nations Studies 306F/G.
Prerequisite(s): At least 0.5 from Anthropology / First Nations Studies 211F/G, 212F/G, (or the former 213F/G or 214F/G), 216F/G, 217F/G, 218F/G, 219F/G, 220E, 231F/G, 232F/G, 233F/G, or 234F/G and registration in Year 3 or 4 in any Arts or Social Science module.
3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 307a, Field Methods in Archaeology
Description: This course provides a practical introduction to field methods and preliminary laboratory techniques of archaeology. Practical training will be given at a field camp to be held at an archaeological site near London.
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 229F/G and registration in Anthropology module Year 3 or 4. Application required.
0.5 course.
Sessions and hours by arrangement.
Note: Permission must be obtained by application to the Department by May 30th of the academic year prior to when the course is scheduled to be offered. Applications are available in the Department of Anthropology.
back to top

Anthropology 308F/G, Debates in Archaeology
Description: This course focuses on theoretical debates of interest to archaeologists and on the methods used to examine them. Topics can include: agricultural origins, the development of social inequality and complexity, the role of gender in interpretation, and various models for intersociety articulation and the building of larger political systems.
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 229F/G and registration in Year 3 or 4 in any module.
3 hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 309F/G, Hunting and Gathering Societies
Description: An overview of issues concerning hunter-gatherers from both an archaeological and ethnographic perspective. Topics include: the usefulness of the "hunter-gatherer" category, debates about the original state of human nature, and the causes of subsistence and societal variability including the shift to agriculture and the development of non-egalitarian societies.
Prerequisite(s): At least 0.5 Social Science or Arts Essay course.
3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 310a/b, Zooarchaeology
Description: An introduction to the range of information about past human groups gleaned from the animal remains. Lectures will cover various topics in zooarchaeological theory and practice. Labs will teach the basics of skeletal identification for fish, birds and mammals, and will provide experience in the identification of fragmentary archaeological remains.
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 229F/G
3 lecture/lab hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 317F/G, Cultural Structures of First Nations Imagination.
Description: Representations of the First Nations, particularly by First Nations writers and artists. Folklore, art, oral tradition, fiction, poetry and drama analyzed in relation to performance of First Nations identity in contemporary Canadian society.
Antirequisite(s): First Nations Studies 317F/G.
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology / First Nations Studies 217F/G or 218F/G and registration in Year 3 or 4 in any module.
3 lecture/seminar hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 320, Archaeological Summer Field School
Description: A detailed, hands-on introduction to the practice of field archaelology. Students will participate in intensive, problem-oriented, research excavations and field laboratory work, (including computer processing of data), on an undisturbed archaelogical site in southwestern Ontario. The course will be held on site during the summer. Students will be expected to attend all day long, every weekday for 4 weeks. Limited Enrollment. Students will be responsible for their own transportation to the site and their own meals. Students are on their own on weekends.
Antirequisite(s): Anthropology 307a
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 026F/G or Anthropology 020E and Anthropology 229F/G or permission of the Department Chair.
Must be registered in Anthropology Year 3 or 4
Permission by application. Applications available in the Department of Anthropology.
4 weeks in the summer - all day long, Monday to Friday. 1.0 course.
back to top

Anthropology 325F/G, Readings in Anthropology
Description: Individual reading and research of current interest in Anthropology. It is up to the student to make arrangements with a Professor in the Department of Anthropology. An application must be completed with approval from the Instructor and the Chair.
Prerequisite(s): Registration in third year in any program with approval from the Instructor and the Department Chair. Applications available in the Department of Anthropology.
Hours to be arranged with Instructor, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 326F/G, Special Topics in Anthropology
Description: Special topics of current interest in Anthropology. List of special topics may be available in the Department.
Prerequisite(s): Registration in third year in any program.
3 lecture/seminar hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 327E, Special Topics in Anthropology
Description: Special topics of interest in Anthropology. List of special topics available in the Anthropology Department.
Prerequisite(s): Registration in third year in any Anthropology module, or permission of the Department.
3 lecture hours, 1.0 course.
back to top

Anthropology 332F/G, Sociocultural Anthropological Perspectives on the Lifecourse
Description: This course examines how various stages in the human lifecourse are understood and experienced differently in diverse socio-cultural contexts. It begins with a cross-cultural examination of theories of conception and then proceeds similarly through discussions of birth, infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood, elderhood, death and the afterlife.
Prerequisite(s): At least 0.5 Social Science or Arts Essay course.
3 hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 333F/G, Symbolic Anthropology
Description: Explores Anthropological theories and analyses of symbol systems. Frameworks examined include among others; structuralism, theory of metaphor, textual analysis and performance theory. This course emphasizes the application of such frameworks to the analysis of ritual, narrative, and the ideologies of social life.
Antirequisite(s): The former Anthropology 333E.
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 222F/G or 245F/G and registration in Year 3 or 4 in any module.
3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 334F/G, Primate and Human Paleontology
Description: This course will combine general principles of vertebrate paleontology and evolutionary biology to examine the fossil evidence for primate and human evolution. Important events, such as primate and hominid origins will be investigated in detail, emphasizing the cross-disciplinary nature of this field of study.
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 226a/b and registration in Year 3 or 4 in any module.
3 hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 335F/G, Historical Linguistics
Description: This course provides an introduction to comparative linguistics. Issues to be discussed will include the study of historical relationships, reconstruction of proto-languages and the implications of linguistic reconstructions for culture history. Current theoretical issues, such as the nature of sound change will also be discussed.
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 027a/b or Linguistics 288a/b and Anthropology 247a and registration in Year 3 or 4 in any module.
3 hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 336F/G, Topics in Human Evolution
Description: This course provides an overview of the fossil evidence for human evolution as a background for the critical examination of controversies in the field. Areas to be explored include human taxonomy, the evolution of human behaviour and the origin of modern humans.
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 226a/b and registration in Year 3 or 4 in any module. Application required.
3 hours, 0.5 course.
Note: Permission must be obtained by application to the Department by May 30th of the academic year prior to when the course is scheduled to be offered.
back to top

Anthropology 337F/G, Topics in Language and Society
Description: An investigation of the interrelationship between language and social structure with particular attention to linguistic differentiation on this basis and the direction of language change. The speech of minority groups will be investigated.
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 027a/b or Linguistics 288a/b and registration in Year 3 or 4 in any module.
3 hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 338F/G, Skeletal Biology
Description: An exploration of the role that skeletal material plays in providing anthropological information. Emphasis will be placed on the analytical techniques used in osteology and odontology for: measuring biological adaptability in archaeological populations; creating individual biographies; the reconstruction of cultural activities.
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 226a/b and registration in Year 3 or 4 in any module. Application required.
1 lecture hour, 2 laboratory hours, 0.5 course.
Note: Permission must be obtained by application to the Department by May 30th of the academic year prior to when the course is scheduled to be offered. Applications are available in the Department of Anthropology.
back to top

Anthropology 341F/G, Anthropology of Food and Nutrition
Description: An examination of cultural attitudes to diet and subsistence and their effects on human biology in both ancient and modern contexts. Areas to be explored include: subsistence strategies and modelling; food ideology and metaphor; processing and preparation; the effects of diet on growth and development; diet related diseases.
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 222F/G and 226a/b and registration in Year 3 or 4 in any module.
3 lecture hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 342a/b, Bioarchaeological Genetics
Description: Determining genetic relationships between and within past populations is at the genesis of bioanthropology. This course provides an overview of the history and current status of bioarchaeological genetics. It details basic transmission, molecular and population genetics and integrates morphogenetic and molecular approaches used in determining intra and between sample relationships.
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 226a/b, or one of Microbiology and Immunology 220a, 221b or Biology 281b
3 hours lecture and lab, 0.5 course
back to top

Anthropology 349F/G, Frontiers and Borderlands
Description: This course will examine the history of indigenous peoples in frontier and borderland regions,
emphasizing the North American experience and drawing on examples from other continents for comparison. The focus will be on the interaction between indigenous and settler cultures, with close attention paid to each colonization experience.
Antirequisite(s): First Nations Studies 349F/G, History 349F/G
Prerequisite(s): Any of First Nations Studies 020E, History 020E or 025E or 027E, or Anthropology 020E or 025F/G
3 lecture/seminar hours, 0.5 course
back to top

Anthropology 400E, Anthropological Thought
Description: Exploration of current anthropological debates and contemporary theoretical frameworks as they may be used in the analysis of anthropological problems and thought.
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 301E or 333F/G (or the former Anthropology 333E) and registration in Year 4 in any module.
3 hours, 1.0 course.
back to top

Anthropology 411F/G, Language and Politics
Description: Using techniques of discourse analysis, the course focuses on the performance of persons, communities and structures as they express their positions. In so doing, it re-examines traditional analytic concepts such as law, power and hegemonic decision-making on the one side, and agency, identity, community, and representation on the other.
Antirequisite(s): Political Science 411F
Prerequisite(s): Fourth year Honours standing in Anthropology, or permission of the department.
2 lecture hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 412F/G, Discourse and Power
Description: Using techniques of discourse analysis, the course examines linkages between discursive practices and relations of power. The analytic models and techniques taught in the course connect micro- and macro-levels of systems and structures with individual agency and explore aspects of hegemony and marginalization.
Antirequisite(s): Political Science 412G
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 411F or Political Science 411F
2 lecture hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 420a/b, Introduction to Paleoepidemiology
Description: Studying disease in ancient populations requires a multidisciplinary approach integrating basic skeletal biological knowledge, clinical diagnostic skills, and epidemiological models integrated within archaeological contexts, including paleoenvironmental reconstructions. This course provides a detailed understanding of the complexities of diagnosing disease in archaeological samples and determining the health status of ancient populations.
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 226a/b or permission of department.
3 hours, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 430F/G, Supervised Reading/Research in Anthropology
Description: Individual reading and research of current interest in Anthropology. It is up to the student to make arrangements with a Professor in the Department of Anthropology. An application must be completed and receive approval from the Instructor and the Chair.
Prerequisite(s): Registration in fourth year in any program with approval from the Instructor and the Department Chair. Applications available in the Department of Anthropology.
Hours to be arranged with Instructor, 0.5 course.
back to top

Anthropology 431F/G, Advanced Special Topics in Anthropology
Description: Special topics of current interest in Anthropology. List of special topics may be available in the Department.
Prerequisite(s): Registration in fourth year in any program.
3 lecture/seminar hours, 0.5 course.
back to top
Academic Calendar 2007 (new)» UNDERGRADUATE COURSE INFORMATION» Anthropology