Academic Calendar - 2020

Western University Academic Calendar. - 2020

Courses


Course Numbering

0001-0999* Pre-University level introductory courses
1000-1999 Year 1 courses
2000-4999 Senior-level undergraduate courses
5000-5999 Professional Degree courses in Dentistry, Education, Law, Medicine and Theology (MTS, MDiv)
6000-6999 Courses offered by Continuing Studies
9000-9999 Graduate Studies courses

* These courses are equivalent to pre-university introductory courses and may be counted for credit in the student's record, unless these courses were taken in a preliminary year. They may not be counted toward essay or breadth requirements, or used to meet modular admission requirements unless it is explicitly stated in the Senate-approved outline of the module.


Suffixes

no suffix 1.0 course not designated as an essay course
A 0.5 course offered in first term
B 0.5 course offered in second term
A/B 0.5 course offered in first and/or second term
E 1.0 essay course
F 0.5 essay course offered in first term
G 0.5 essay course offered in second term
F/G 0.5 essay course offered in first and/or second term
H 1.0 accelerated course (8 weeks)
J 1.0 accelerated course (6 weeks)
K 0.75 course
L 0.5 graduate course offered in summer term (May - August)
Q/R/S/T 0.25 course offered within a regular session
U 0.25 course offered in other than a regular session
W/X 1.0 accelerated course (full course offered in one term)
Y 0.5 course offered in other than a regular session
Z 0.5 essay course offered in other than a regular session

Glossary


Prerequisite

A course that must be successfully completed prior to registration for credit in the desired course.


Corequisite

A course that must be taken concurrently with (or prior to registration in) the desired course.


Antirequisite

Courses that overlap sufficiently in course content that both cannot be taken for credit.


Essay Courses

Many courses at Western have a significant writing component. To recognize student achievement, a number of such courses have been designated as essay courses and will be identified on the student's record (E essay full course; F/G/Z essay half-course).


Principal Courses

A first year course that is listed by a department offering a module as a requirement for admission to the module. For admission to an Honours Specialization module or Double Major modules in an Honours Bachelor degree, at least 3.0 courses will be considered principal courses.



Campus





Course Level






Course Type




Global Great Books


This course explores a variety of accounts regarding human happiness through the reading of primary texts from around the world, from the ancient to the contemporary period. Students will explore what it means to be happy from a number of global perspectives.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This interdisciplinary course explores what it means to be human. Through the exclusive study of complete primary texts from around the world, including, but not limited to works of philosophy, literature, and film, students will investigate questions surrounding the idea of human nature and the purpose of human life.

Prerequisite(s): Global Great Books 1002F/G or permission of Coordinator.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This interdisciplinary course investigates the nature and meaning of love. By studying primary texts from around the world, including, works of philosophy, literature, and film, students will explore ideas about different forms of love and its role in a variety of contexts, including families, friendships, romantic relationships, and political communities.

Prerequisite(s): Global Great Books 1002F/G or permission of Coordinator.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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By studying primary texts from around the world, including, works of philosophy, literature, and film, students will investigate varying accounts of justice, assess how competing arguments and changing circumstances affect what it means to be just, and the relationship between social responsibility, justice and the law.

Prerequisite(s): Global Great Books 1002F/G or permission of Coordinator.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Studying texts from around the world, students will investigate the relationship between the natural world and technology. We will explore how technology can enhance our appreciation and use of nature, while also being a disruptive force. Students will seek to assess how these competing values can be balanced.

Prerequisite(s): Global Great Books 1002F/G or permission of Coordinator.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Engaging in texts from around the world students will explore different aesthetic theories, assess these accounts while engaging with works of art, explore the relationship of the imagination to reason, and think about the role the beautiful plays in human fulfillment.

Prerequisite(s): Global Great Books 1002F/G or permission of Coordinator.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Reading texts from around the world, students will investigate the nature of reason and that of faith, as well as their relationship to one another. Can faith be rational? Does reason supersede the need for faith?

Prerequisite(s): Global Great Books 1002F/G or permission of Coordinator.

Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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The capstone course integrates and extends the theories, methods, and findings across GGB courses. Students will be given an opportunity to propose and engage in an extensive research project concerning a primary text or group of texts, with the end of illuminating a contemporary issue or problem.


Extra Information: 3 hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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