Academic Calendar - 2021

Western University Academic Calendar. - 2021

Courses


Course Numbering

0001-0999* Pre-University level introductory courses
1000-1999 Year 1 courses
2000-4999 Senior-level undergraduate courses
5000-5999 Professional Degree courses in Dentistry, Education, Law, Medicine and Theology (MTS, MDiv)
6000-6999 Courses offered by Continuing Studies
9000-9999 Graduate Studies courses

* These courses are equivalent to pre-university introductory courses and may be counted for credit in the student's record, unless these courses were taken in a preliminary year. They may not be counted toward essay or breadth requirements, or used to meet modular admission requirements unless it is explicitly stated in the Senate-approved outline of the module.


Suffixes

no suffix 1.0 course not designated as an essay course
A 0.5 course offered in first term
B 0.5 course offered in second term
A/B 0.5 course offered in first and/or second term
E 1.0 essay course
F 0.5 essay course offered in first term
G 0.5 essay course offered in second term
F/G 0.5 essay course offered in first and/or second term
H 1.0 accelerated course (8 weeks)
J 1.0 accelerated course (6 weeks)
K 0.75 course
L 0.5 graduate course offered in summer term (May - August)
Q/R/S/T 0.25 course offered within a regular session
U 0.25 course offered in other than a regular session
W/X 1.0 accelerated course (full course offered in one term)
Y 0.5 course offered in other than a regular session
Z 0.5 essay course offered in other than a regular session

Glossary


Prerequisite

A course that must be successfully completed prior to registration for credit in the desired course.


Corequisite

A course that must be taken concurrently with (or prior to registration in) the desired course.


Antirequisite

Courses that overlap sufficiently in course content that both cannot be taken for credit.


Essay Courses

Many courses at Western have a significant writing component. To recognize student achievement, a number of such courses have been designated as essay courses and will be identified on the student's record (E essay full course; F/G/Z essay half-course).


Principal Courses

A first year course that is listed by a department offering a module as a requirement for admission to the module. For admission to an Honours Specialization module or Double Major modules in an Honours Bachelor degree, at least 3.0 courses will be considered principal courses.



Campus





Course Level






Course Type




Applied Mathematics


Applications of integration, integration using mathematical software packages. Scaling and allometry. Basic probability theory. Fundamentals of linear algebra: vectors, matrices, matrix algebra. Difference and differential equations. Each topic will be illustrated by examples and applications from the biological sciences, such as population growth, predator-prey dynamics, age-structured populations.

Prerequisite(s): One or more of Calculus 1000A/B, Calculus 1500A/B or Mathematics 1225A/B.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 2 tutorial hour.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Behind the polished presentations of most mathematical results there often lie dramatically powerful experimental methods. Modern computational tools have vastly increased the effectiveness of this approach. This course provides tools and opportunities for experiment and the discovery of new mathematics. The best projects from this course will be published.

Corequisite(s): Calculus 1000A/B or Calculus 1500A/B or Numerical and Mathematical Methods 1412A/B or the former Applied Mathematics 1412A/B. The former Applied Mathematics 1413 can be used in place of Numerical and Mathematical Methods 1412A/B.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 2 computer lab hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Introduction to first order differential equations, linear second and higher order differential equations with applications, complex numbers including Euler's formula, series solutions, Bessel and Legendre equations, existence and uniqueness, introduction to systems of linear differential equations.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum mark of 60% in Calculus 1301A/B, or a minimum mark of 55% in Calculus 1501A/B or Numerical and Mathematical Methods 1414A/B or the former Applied Mathematics 1414A/B or the former Applied Mathematics 1413. Integrated Science 1001X with a minimum mark of 60% can be used in place of Calculus 1301A/B. Pre-or Corequisite(s): Mathematics 1600A/B.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours, 1 laboratory hour.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Vector space examples. Inner products, orthogonal sets including Legendre polynomials, trigonometric functions, wavelets. Projections, least squares, normal equations, Fourier approximations. Eigenvalue problems, diagonalization, defective matrices. Coupled difference and differential equations; applications such as predator-prey, business competition, coupled oscillators. Singular value decomposition, image approximations. Linear transformations, graphics.

Prerequisite(s): (Numerical and Mathematical Methods 1411A/B or the former Applied Mathematics 1411A/B, or a minimum mark of 60% in Mathematics 1600A/B) and (Numerical and Mathematical Methods 1414A/B or Calculus 1301A/B or Calculus 1501A/B, or the former Applied Mathematics 1413 or the former Applied Mathematics 1414A/B). Integrated Science 1001X with a minimum mark of 60% can be used in place of Calculus 1301A/B.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Introduction to numerical analysis; polynomial interpolation, numerical integration, matrix computations, linear systems, nonlinear equations and optimization, the initial value problem. Assignments using a computer and the software package, Matlab, are an important component of this course.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum mark of 55% in Mathematics 1600A/B. Pre-or Corequisite(s): Calculus 2302A/B, Calculus 2402A/B or Calculus 2502A/B.

Extra Information:3 lecture hours, 1 laboratory hour.

Course Weight: 0.50
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An introduction to mathematical biology. Case studies from neuroscience,immunology, medical imaging, cell biology, molecular evolution and ecology will give an overview of this diverse field, illustrating standard mathematical approaches such as compartmental analysis and evolutionary game theory.

Prerequisite(s): One of Calculus 2302A/B, Calculus 2402A/B, Calculus 2502A/B; plus one of Mathematics 1600A/B or the former Linear Algebra 1600A/B, or Applied Mathematics 1411A/B.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Functions of a complex variable, analytic functions, integration in the complex plane, Taylor and Laurent series, analytic continuation, Cauchy's theorem, evaluation of integrals using residue theory, applications to Laplace transforms, conformal mapping and its applications.

Antirequisite(s): Mathematics 3124A/B.

Prerequisite(s): Calculus 2303A/B or Calculus 2503A/B.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Existence and uniqueness of solutions, phase space, singular points, stability, periodic attractors, Poincaré-Bendixson theorem, examples from physics, biology and engineering, frequency (phase) locking, parametric resonance, Floquet theory, stability of periodic solutions, strange attractors and chaos, Lyapunov exponents, chaos in nature, fractals.

Prerequisite(s): Applied Mathematics 2402A or the former Differential Equations 2402A; Calculus 2303A/B or Calculus 2503A/B and Mathematics 1600A/B or the former Linear Algebra 1600A/B.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Boundary value problems for Laplace, heat, and wave equations; derivation of equations; separation of variables; Fourier series; Sturm-Liouville Theory; eigenfunction expansions; cylindrical and spherical problems; Legendre and Bessel functions; spherical harmonics; Fourier and Laplace transforms.

Prerequisite(s): (i) Mathematics 1600A/B; Applied Mathematics 2402A; Calculus 2303A/B or Calculus 2503A/B; or (ii) Calculus 2402A/B and Statistical Sciences 2503A/B. In each course a minimum mark of 60% is required.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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An introduction to neural networks, covering the fundamentals of neural computation and how networks of neurons support information processing in the brain. Coursework will introduce techniques in computational modeling, programming and data science, focusing on recent developments in deep learning as applied to the context of explaining the brain.

Prerequisite(s): Applied Mathematics 3813A/B, Applied Mathematics 3815A/B and the former Applied Mathematics 3911F/G, or with the permission of the Department.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 2 computer lab hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Variational principles, methods of approximation, basis functions, convergence of approximations, solution of steady state problems, solution of time-dependent problems. Each student will be required to complete two major computational projects.

Prerequisite(s): Applied Mathematics 2814F/G. Corequisite(s): Applied Mathematics 3815A/B or equivalent.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours. Offered in alternate years with Numerical and Mathematical Methods 4617A/B.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Strengths and limitations of computer algebra systems (CAS); complexity of exact computations versus possible instability of numerical computations; selecta from Groebner bases, resultants, fractional derivatives, Risch integration algorithm, special functions including the Lambert W function. The emphasis is on preparing the student to use CAS in mathematics, science, and engineering.

Prerequisite(s): Applied Mathematics 2814F/G or the former Applied Mathematics 2413, the former Applied Mathematics 2415.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Boundary value problems for Laplace and Helmholtz equations, initial value problems for heat and wave equations, in one to three dimensions; Green's functions in bounded and unbounded domains; Method of Images.

Prerequisite(s): Applied Mathematics 3815A/B.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.May be offered in alternate years.

Course Weight: 0.50
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The student will work on a project under faculty supervision. The project may involve an extension, or more detailed coverage, of material presented in other courses. Credit for the course will involve a written as well as oral presentation.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in the fourth year of a program in Applied Mathematics.

Course Weight: 0.50
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