Academic Calendar - 2018

Western University Academic Calendar. - 2018

Courses


Course Numbering

0001-0999* Pre-University level introductory courses
1000-1999 Year 1 courses
2000-4999 Senior-level undergraduate courses
5000-5999 Professional Degree courses in Dentistry, Education, Law, Medicine and Theology (MTS, MDiv)
6000-6999 Courses offered by Continuing Studies
9000-9999 Graduate Studies courses

* These courses are equivalent to pre-university introductory courses and may be counted for credit in the student's record, unless these courses were taken in a preliminary year. They may not be counted toward essay or breadth requirements, or used to meet modular admission requirements unless it is explicitly stated in the Senate-approved outline of the module.


Suffixes

no suffix 1.0 course not designated as an essay course
A 0.5 course offered in first term
B 0.5 course offered in second term
A/B 0.5 course offered in first and/or second term
E 1.0 essay course
F 0.5 essay course offered in first term
G 0.5 essay course offered in second term
F/G 0.5 essay course offered in first and/or second term
H 1.0 accelerated course (8 weeks)
J 1.0 accelerated course (6 weeks)
K 0.75 course
L 0.5 graduate course offered in summer term (May - August)
Q/R/S/T 0.25 course offered within a regular session
U 0.25 course offered in other than a regular session
W/X 1.0 accelerated course (full course offered in one term)
Y 0.5 course offered in other than a regular session
Z 0.5 essay course offered in other than a regular session

Glossary


Prerequisite

A course that must be successfully completed prior to registration for credit in the desired course.


Corequisite

A course that must be taken concurrently with (or prior to registration in) the desired course.


Antirequisite

Courses that overlap sufficiently in course content that both cannot be taken for credit.


Essay Courses

Many courses at Western have a significant writing component. To recognize student achievement, a number of such courses have been designated as essay courses and will be identified on the student's record (E essay full course; F/G/Z essay half-course).


Principal Courses

A first year course that is listed by a department offering a module as a requirement for admission to the module. For admission to an Honors Specialization module or Double Major modules in an Honors Bachelor degree, at least 3.0 courses will be considered principal courses.



Campus





Course Level






Course Type




Media, Information and Technoculture


This survey course introduces students to the critical study of mediated communication and explores the ways technology, information, and media interact with culture and society. Topics may include: cultural industries, political economy, identity/diversity, promotional culture, the information society, political communication, journalism studies, and social media.

Antirequisite(s): MIT 1021F/G and/or MIT 1022F/G, the former MIT 1200F/G, MIT 1500F/G and/or MIT 1700F/G.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour.

Course Weight: 1.00
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The first of two half-courses that introduces students to the critical study of mediated communication and explores the ways technology, information, and media interact with culture and society. Topics may include: cultural industries, political economy, identity/diversity, promotional culture, the information society, political communication, journalism studies, and social media.

Antirequisite(s): MIT 1020E, the former MIT 1200F/G, MIT 1500F/G and/or MIT 1700F/G.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour.

Course Weight: 0.50
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The second of two half-courses that introduces students to the critical study of mediated communication and explores the ways technology, information, and media interact with culture and society. Topics may include: cultural industries, political economy, identity/diversity, promotional culture, the information society, political communication, journalism studies, and social media.

Antirequisite(s): MIT 1020E, the former MIT 1200F/G, MIT 1500F/G and/or MIT 1700F/G.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This writing-intensive course provides first-year FIMS students with foundational skills in scholarly research, appropriate evaluation of information sources, and textual, visual, and media analysis. In a combination of lectures and tutorials, students will produce short projects that reflect a number of modes of interpretation and analyze a variety of media.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Media permeate every nook and cranny of our daily lives. This course examines how we use media to shape our world through social networking, advertising and branding, activism and politics, privacy and surveillance, celebrity and entertainment culture, sounds and music, representation and identity, and global news and media.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course introduces students to the technical and creative production of mediated communication. They will learn basic production principles and use these to analyze and create audio, visual and digital content related to and derived from mass communication through a variety of in-class exercises and creative projects.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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The course examines communication throughout history. It explores the relationship of communication media and technologies to society and culture. The course covers the history of different communication media, such as the printing press, telegraph, radio and television broadcasting, film and sound recording, and the Internet.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours and 1 tutorial hour.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course introduces basic concepts of political economy to the study of contemporary media. By examining corporate, public and alternative media formations, it provides students with the tools to analyze intersections of power and wealth in societies and economies increasingly centered on the profitable exploitation of culture and information.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course explores the role of media and visual culture in shaping our environment, worldviews, and senses of self and identity, including issues related to gender, sexuality, class, race and ethnicity, and ability and disability.

Antirequisite(s): The former MIT 2510F/G.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Examines the role of advertising, promotion and marketing in our culture, the relation of these practices to a `consumer society', the connections between advertising and propaganda, the ways marketing may or may not be used for purposes other than profit, and how markets and marketing influence media.

Antirequisite(s): The former MIT 2306F/G.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course examines the relationships between media, social movements, and social change. By exploring struggles over issues such as democracy, the environment, human rights, gender equality, class relations, and race and ethnic relations, we will map the ways that participants use media, and the obstacles they confront.

Antirequisite(s): The former MIT 2901F/G.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Popular culture is shaped by industrial complexes such as the major ¬ film studios and music labels, the videogames business, comic book publishing, and radio and television networks. This course examines such cultural industries, considering the role of audiences and fans, and the myths and realities of creative cultural work.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Investigates some of the controversies about, and skills of, journalism, studying both mainstream news services and citizen journalism, and providing an introduction to journalistic writing and news production, and the everyday practices of various types of news organizations.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course explores social media, such as Facebook and Twitter, virtual worlds, online games, networked communities, new media and e-learning. It examines topics including on online identity, gender in cyberspace, videogame culture, Web 2.0, digital design, surveillance and privacy.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course provides an introduction to some of the legal aspects of media, including issues of copyright and intellectual property, access to information and privacy, slander and libel, and also discusses the ethical questions confronting media and information professionals.

Antirequisite(s): The former MIT 2020F/G and/or the former MIT 2021F/G.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Discover how access to and control of behind-the-scenes information is a major force in our lives. This course explores how search engines harvest "big" data from users and use it to map, analyze, and exploit patterns of online behaviour for marketing, government and corporate intelligence, and other purposes.

Antirequisite(s): The former MIT 2376F/G.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course is an introduction to the role played by communication and culture in international and transnational relations. Through the use of theories and examples, we examine a range of issues related to power relations, economic development and cultural change using readings and concepts from communication studies, international relations, sociology, and other disciplines.

Antirequisite(s): The former MIT 2211F/G.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course examines the impact of popular music as a vital part of media culture with topics such as the music business, music and gender, digital music, popular music on television, and music celebrities.

Antirequisite(s): The former MIT 2350F/G.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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The course explores traditions within media and cultural theory, including traditions such as cultural studies, semiotics, hermeneutics, poststructuralism and postmodernism. These traditions arise from debates around such issues as: audience/reader activity, diversity, context, texts and textual determination, ideology and hegemony, discourse, and socio-cultural constructions.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 1 tutorial hour.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Exploration of a number of technologies that lie behind and fuel the technocultural imagination. Introduces contemporary technologies from both a technical and cultural/historical point of view. Topics include: technological systems, issues of technical visualization, representation and interactivity, natural vs. artificial languages, artificial intelligence, robotics, natural and virtual environments, technology as social imperative and cultural metaphor.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours and 1 tutorial hour.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course emphasizes the development and manipulation of sound sources, especially music, within a mixed media context. Students will be introduced to music-specific technologies and concepts that can be applied to a multimedia environment. Previous music experience is not required, however students will acquire some musical skills and study certain musical concepts.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course concentrates on developing digital imaging skills for the WWW and introduces HTML. Secondly, it focuses on the design and production of information for web sites, which communicate through the integrated use of text, images and graphic elements. The cultural significance and theoretical implications of this medium will be explored.

Antirequisite(s): Digital Communication 2203A/B.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course introduces the student to the concepts of visual literacy. Study concentrates on the elements and principles of basic two dimensional designs, visual communication and its objective theoretical application. Current industry standard vector-based, bitmap-based and presentation software applications are introduced to allow the student to practice and exercise visual literacy.

Antirequisite(s): Registration in the Multimedia Design and Production stream of the MTP Program.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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An introductory course in digital video production that will engage students in the production, history, and theories of moving images. Through the integration of lectures, screenings, and studio assignments, students will obtain the necessary critical and technical skills to produce short, creative digital video projects.

Antirequisite(s): MIT 2660A/B if taken in 2010-11, 2011-12, 2012-13 or 2013-14.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours.

Prerequisite(s): At least 65% in each of MIT 1200F/G, MIT 1500F/G and MIT 1700F/G.

Course Weight: 0.50
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An introduction to the range of research methods appropriate for understanding scholarship in the fields of communications, information, and media studies, including surveys, interviewing, content analysis and ethnography. Students will study specific methods in the context of the media-related topics that these methods have been used to address.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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The subject of a Directed Readings course will be selected by a student in consultation with a full-time faculty member willing to direct the course. Registration in the third or fourth year of an MIT program is required. Permission of the Faculty is required.

Course Weight: 1.00
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The subject of a Directed Readings course will be selected by a student in consultation with a full-time faculty member willing to direct the course. Registration in the third or fourth year of an MIT program is required. Permission of the Faculty is required.

Course Weight: 0.50
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The MIT Academic Internship is an unpaid, credit internship for up to four months, or a minimum of 140 hours. The internship will require students to make connections with academic study while undertaking supervised duties in organizations and businesses with media-related or information-related interests, public service organizations, and community groups. The student is required to a) maintain a suitable level of performance in the position as verified by the employer through evaluations and b) submit a mid-term as well as a final report, demonstrating how the experience gained through the internship relates to his/her coursework and program of study.

Antirequisite(s): MIT 3990F/G, MIT 3991F/G.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in the third or fourth year of a module in MIT or MPI, with a minimum cumulative average of 72%, and have no failures or documented academic offences. Approval of, and acceptance into, an internship placement.

Extra Information: The internship is given 0.5 course credit, and will show on the student's transcript as Pass with Distinction, Pass, or Fail.

Course Weight: 0.50
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The MIT Academic Internship II is an unpaid, credit internship for up to four months, or a minimum of 140 hours. The internship will require students to make further connections with academic study while undertaking supervised duties in organizations and businesses with media-related or information-related interests, public service organizations, and community groups. In addition, a faculty supervisor will grade the required in-depth research paper relating the knowledge gained on the internship to the theoretical underpinnings of media studies.

Antirequisite(s): MIT 3990F/G, MIT 3991F/G.

Prerequisite(s): Completion of MIT 3090F/G/Z Academic Internship I with Pass with Distinction, plus a cumulative average of 78% and no failures or documented academic offences. The student must find a faculty supervisor willing to oversee and grade his/her final paper.

Extra Information: The internship is given a 0.5 course credit, with a numeric grade based on the paper and fulfilment of the internship requirements.

Course Weight: 0.50
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The Short Term Professional Internship is a paid, non-credit internship for up to four months or for a minimum of 140 hours. The paid internship will require students to make connections with academic study while undertaking supervised duties in organizations and businesses with media-related or information-related interests, public service organizations, and community groups.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in the third or fourth year of a module in MIT or MPI with a minimum cumulative average of 70% and no failures or documented academic offences. Approval of, and acceptance into, an internship placement.

Extra Information: The short term professional internship is not given academic credit, but does show on the student's transcript as Pass/Fail.

Course Weight: 0
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The Long Term Professional Internship is a paid, non-credit placement for 8, 12 or 16 months. The paid internship will require students to make connections with academic study while undertaking supervised duties in organizations and businesses with media-related or information-related interests, public service organizations, and community groups.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in the third or fourth year of a module in MIT or MPI with a minimum cumulative average of 70%, and no failures. Must be eligible to work in Canada (or the country of the placement).

Extra Information: The Long Term Professional Internship is not given academic credit, but does show on the student's transcript as a Pass/Fail. Participation in a long term professional internship will delay graduation by one year.

Course Weight: 3.00
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The Long Term Professional Internship is a paid, non-credit placement for 8, 12 or 16 months. The paid internship will require students to make connections with academic study while undertaking supervised duties in organizations and businesses with media-related or information-related interests, public service organizations, and community groups.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in the third or fourth year of a module in MIT or MPI with a minimum cumulative average of 70%, and no failures. Must be eligible to work in Canada (or the country of the placement).

Extra Information: The Long Term Professional Internship is not given academic credit, but does show on the student's transcript as a Pass/Fail. Participation in a long term professional internship will delay graduation by one year.

Course Weight: 3.00
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The Long Term Professional Internship is a paid, non-credit placement for 8, 12 or 16 months. The paid internship will require students to make connections with academic study while undertaking supervised duties in organizations and businesses with media-related or information-related interests, public service organizations, and community groups.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in the third or fourth year of a module in MIT or MPI with a minimum cumulative average of 70%, and no failures. Must be eligible to work in Canada (or the country of the placement).

Extra Information: The Long Term Professional Internship is not given academic credit, but does show on the student's transcript as a Pass/Fail. Participation in a long term professional internship will delay graduation by one year.

Course Weight: 3.00
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The Long Term Professional Internship is a paid, non-credit placement for 8, 12 or 16 months. The paid internship will require students to make connections with academic study while undertaking supervised duties in organizations and businesses with media-related or information-related interests, public service organizations, and community groups.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in the third or fourth year of a module in MIT or MPI with a minimum cumulative average of 70%, and no failures. Must be eligible to work in Canada (or the country of the placement).

Extra Information: The Long Term Professional Internship is not given academic credit, but does show on the student's transcript as a Pass/Fail. Participation in a long term professional internship will delay graduation by one year.

Course Weight: 3.00
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This course addresses a variety of issues pertaining to a public sphere for free and democratic flows of information. How do information circuits influence the production, organization, and dissemination of information, whether print, digital, electronic, audio or visual? How do such circuits configure public access, knowledge production, and cultural representations?

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Our global village is fractured by vast inequalities in access to the means of communication. This course examines the planetary interplay of power, wealth and information, with particular attention to debates about North/South information flows, cultural imperialism, transnational media corporations and the role of new communications technologies in globalization.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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The course digs beneath the hype about the "new economy" to examine the real dynamics of commodification that are emerging from the interaction between digital networks and high capitalism. Topics include dot.commercialization, virtual advertising, open/closed networks, Web content industries, portals and search engines, knowbots and market agents, and piracy.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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What economic conditions influence production inside the entertainment industries? How is digitalization changing the politics of entertainment production? What potential does digitalization hold for innovation and cultural diversity? How are Canadian businesses faring inside the global entertainment sector? These are among the key questions that this course aims to answer.

Antirequisite(s): MIT 3437G if taken in 2009-10, MIT 3871F/G in 2010-11 or 2011-12.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course will explore the impact that User-Generated Content, Social Networks & Immaterial Labour have had on Autonomist Marxist theory. The course will consider the changes taking place in the nature of the labour process, the products being produced by this shift to immaterial work, and the influence that this shift has had on Autonomist Marxism.

Antirequisite(s): MIT 3771F if taken in 2009-10, 2010-11 or 2011-12, Digital Communication 3205F/G.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Are there differences in how American and Canadian scholars approach media and communication? And if so, what are the differences and why do they exist? This course aspires to answer these central questions. Canada is situated differently (geographically, economically, militarily, culturally) than the USA, and these differences play out in the respective media/ communication theories.

Antirequisite(s): MIT 3438G if taken in 2008-2009, MIT 3439G if taken in 2012-2013 or 2013-2014.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course offers students the critical tools to explore how shifting modes of representation from oral songs and stories to information technology, effect our cultural conceptions of 'the outlaw' and of justice. The course incorporates a theory of the outlaw as an extraordinary criminal caught in a liminal threshold 'outside the law.'

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course investigates how human sexuality and sexual identity are represented through various media (film, advertising, television, print and electronic media). We will look at how media sources both reinforce and challenge dominant understandings of concepts commonly associated with sexuality, including masculinity and femininity, and heterosexuality and homosexuality.

Antirequisite(s): The former MIT 2375F/G.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course will examine some of the issues that arise from such commercial - and non-commercial - activity. Topics include structure and symbolism in advertising, consumption as communication, the potential link between advertising and purchase, the perpetuation of stereotypes and other promises and perils pertaining to the marketing machine.

Antirequisite(s): MIT 3850G if taken in 2010-2011, MIT 3851G if taken in 2011-12 or 2012-13 or MIT 3851F if taken in 2013-2014.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course provides a critical survey of issues related to children's advertising, marketing, and consumer culture. The historic rise of children's marketing, the value advertisers place on children, and contemporary controversial debates will be investigated and located within broad theoretical, cultural, social, and institutional contexts.

Antirequisite(s): MIT 3402F if taken in 2009-10 or 2010-11, MIT 3404F if taken in Intersession in 2010, or MIT 3402G in 2011-12.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course considers the television industry's address to women viewers, focusing on the multichannel transition and the post-network period. We will consider the roles played by genre, character and content in making "women's television", and will pay particular attention to the medium's ongoing dialogue with feminism.

Antirequisite(s): MIT 3435F if taken in 2010-11 or 2011-12.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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In examining fictional and real-life monstrous women - including witches, sex workers, body modifiers, cyborgs, and serial killers - we will consider what monstrous femininity means, how technology and the media contribute to (re)defining female deviance, and what happens when the monstrous figure of the deviant diva becomes the Western cultural norm.

Antirequisite(s): MIT 3433G if taken in 2009-10, 2010-11 or 2011-12.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course will apply a variety of feminist theories to investigate the construction of gender by a range of historical and contemporary media - newspapers, magazines, radio, television, film, the Internet and advertising.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Why do we celebrate stars? What can the analysis of celebrity reveal about modern ideas of self and individual identity? This course introduces critical work on the phenomenon of stardom, develops case studies of individual film, television, and popular music stars, and investigates the institutional and industrial processes that have created celebrities.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course interrogates media images of masculinity ca. 1946-76. It will examine the long-lasting social and cultural consequences of the remarkable shifts in the construction and representation of Western masculinity which took place between the end of the Second World War and the rise of the Counterculture. The course focuses on gender, power, and culture.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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The class will examine the idea of audience as it is conceptualized in communication theory and research. The course will focus on theoretical readings and debates about the nature and definition of the audience, and look at the function of the audience for the media industry and for culture.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Examines the emergence and consolidation of modern advertising in Canada and the United States. Explores sociocultural changes that reconfigured people's relationship to consumer goods and advertising's role in promoting this transformation. The relationships between advertisers, ad agencies and media industries are examined.

Prerequisite(s): At least 65% in each of MIT 1200F/G, MIT 1500F/G and MIT 1700F/G.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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War is the machine that created many of the technologies that we depend on in this century. This course considers the ways in which we sift war through media filters, the stories we tell ourselves (and the way we mediate those stories) about gender and power, truth and myth, the body and spirit, the technosphere and biosphere. Using a wide variety of media products, the course will examine the mediation of high-tech information systems, global armament, and the mechanization of death.

Prerequisite(s): At least 65% in MIT 1200F/G.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course examines the historical development and social significance of the contemporary culture of consumption. After exploring its history and dynamics, among other subjects, it looks at advertising and marketing, Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) applications, globalization, and strategies of resistance.

Prerequisite(s): MIT 2100F/G.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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The formation of public opinion and its role in democratic society. Theories of attitude and opinion formation and persuasion. Study of propaganda. Current issues in public opinion and the "manufacture of consent."

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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From Trinity to Postmodernity, from the culture of containment to the contamination of culture, this course explores not only the history of America after WWII, but also the impact of the Atom Bomb, the Cold War, and their continuing influence on the formation of American ideology and identity. Using the twin themes of confinement and resistance, the course will focus primarily on media such as literature and film, but will also consider representative examples from journalism, the visual arts, and architecture.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course examines various forms of media convergence (industrial, regulatory, technological, and cultural) and how interaction between television and digital media can alter sociocultural understandings of mass media industries and technologies. In addition, it examines the evolution of a formerly passive audience into active 'produsers' and investigates the democratizing potential of interactive and user-generated media.

Antirequisite(s): MIT 3404F if taken in 2009-10, 2010-11 or 2011-12.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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What is history if not a reconstructed image of the past? This course examines the ways in which photography has shaped our idea of history; how specific photographs ground history by turning the world into a picture. The political significance of this transformation will be examined through specific visual case studies.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Traces the development of the idea of "entertainment" in commercial radio and television, and situates the institutions of broadcast entertainment within wider debates around leisure, popular taste and culture. Theoretical and historical approaches to radio and television will be introduced.

Antirequisite(s): The former MIT 2305A/B.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course examines representations of Hollywood in film, television, and print. From Day of the Locust (1939) to Tropic Thunder (2008), we explore Hollywood as a model for what constitutes the "real" in contemporary culture, and how these representations inform the American political landscape and constructions of sexuality, desire, and identity.

Antirequisite(s): MIT 2406G if taken in 2010-11 or MIT 2406F in 2011-12 or 2012-13 or the former MIT 2307F/G.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Our reliance on private transport has produced a landscape dominated by the automobile: an environment to which we are culturally blind. This course is not a strict history of the car. It is a sustained examination of how a particular technology can become intertwined with a society's political and economic processes.

Antirequisite(s): MIT 2410G if taken in 2009-10, or MIT 2411G in 2010-11 or MIT 2411F in 2011-12 or the former MIT 2309F/G.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course aims to ground students in the historical development in the methods of how propaganda and persuasion have been utilized in print and visual culture, spanning Greco-Roman art and rhetoric, contemporary use of diverse media, and how new techniques were developed alongside new forms of media technology (such as blogging).

Antirequisite(s): The former MIT 2377F/G.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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The current influx of "J-Pop" into the North American mainstream makes it important to consider the cultural context from which these products emerge. This course will explore contemporary Japanese visual and technoculture, and will consider how the Japanese aesthetic is forcing us to rethink our own approach to technology and design in the West.

Antirequisite(s): MIT 3775G if taken in 2011-12, 2012-13, or 2013-14.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course will run along three parallel tracks: it will examine the history of comic books and how they engaged such political issues as World War II and the cultural revolution of the 1960s; it will show how comics have crossed over into other popular media, mainly film; and it will look at comic books as a serious aesthetic medium, trying to understand them as a form of sequential art.

Antirequisite(s): The former MIT 2282F/G.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course explores the emergence and consolidation of modern advertising from the 1880s until the 1980s. It examines the development and growth of ad agencies, advertising practices, and commercial media, with a focus on iconic ad campaigns. The course deals with advertising’s impact on popular culture, as seen in novels, film, and television. It also probes how governments, politicians, and other social actors used advertising to re-configure 20th century public life.

Antirequisite(s): MIT 3403G if taken in 2011-12, 2012-2013, 2014-2015 or 2015-2016, MIT 3403F in 2012-2013, 2014-2015 or 2016-2017.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This class takes artists as working people and examines the production of commercial popular music as a set of work processes, focusing on legal, discursive, technological, and economic contexts. We explore the relations of performers—especially recording artists—to their work, their personae, their audiences, and their intellectual property.

Antirequisite(s): MIT 3439F if taken in 2014-15, MIT 3439G in 2015-16 or 2016-17.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course examines how different popular musics produce the complex social, political and economic processes that constitute contemporary 'globalization'. Topics include: 'cultural imperialism' versus 'cultural globalization', the worldwide diffusion of recording technology, the global music industry in action, musical 'others' past and present, and the emerging problematics of 'world music'.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Liz Phair's 1993 recording Exile in Guyville was upfront in acknowledging what female and male fans of popular music, especially rock'n'roll know but don't necessarily want to admit: rock'n'roll is a "guy thing." But is it? This course explores meanings, constructions and representations of gender in popular music of the 20th and 21st centuries, including but not limited to rock'n'roll. The course is taught from a media studies perspective, so no formal musical knowledge is expected.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course will explore how music videos have served as a space for the interaction between art and advertising. It will investigate the music video's cultural, sexual, and ideological influences on a generation of television viewers who have been molded into an ideal demographic for the consumption of both media and consumer goods.

Antirequisite(s): MIT 3651F/G if taken in 2010-11, 2011-2012, 2012-2013 or 2013-2014.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course uses feminist theoretical perspectives to explore the following topics: virtual feminist communities and cyberspaces; representation of women in education, media and information professions; the uses of the Internet for networking, feminist activism and community development; teleworking and female entrepreneurship; training for information technologies; issues of demography and diversity.

Antirequisite(s): The former MIT 2372F/G.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Video and computer games have, over the last thirty years, revolutionized popular culture, digital technology and the entertainment industry. At the same time they have provoked intense controversy over issues from game addiction to virtual violence to digital gender. This course gives an overview of the history of interactive gaming, its economic dynamics, the social formations it is catalyzing and the new theories of aesthetics, simulation and play it has generated.

Antirequisite(s): Digital Communication 3206F/G.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Digital games can have a powerful influence on the human mind. This course deals with the design and analysis of digital games from a cognitive perspective. It examines why design is important - that is, how it can promote shallow thinking, or vice versa support mindful reasoning and higher-order thinking.

Antirequisite(s): MIT 3663B if taken in 2009-10 or 2010-11, Digital Communication 3207A/B.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course provides hands-on experience with building, evaluating, and using social media tools such as blogs, wikis, and social networking websites within an organizational context. Relevant issues such as user privacy, social media policies, effective planning and implementation, and organizational impact will be addressed.

Antirequisite(s): MIT 3852G if taken in 2011-2012, Digital Communication 3209F/G.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course will investigate the term social networking and its related theories. We will examine various platforms and the social consequences these have had for our understanding of friendship, work, and privacy. Our aim is to not only have a good understanding of the theories of social networking, but also of the methodological approaches that exist to study how social networking unfolds.

Antirequisite(s): MIT 3650G if taken in 2011-2012, Digital Communication 3208F/G.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Social networking has as long history as human civilization itself. In today's online environment, Twitter and Facebook have altered the social landscape. Students will explore the historical, theoretical, and practical aspects of social networking, and study its contexts and social issues such as bullying, anonymity, addiction, anxiety, and narcissism.

Antirequisite(s): The former MIT 2374F/G, Digital Communication 2200F/G.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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An exploration of the importance of electronic communications and learning technologies to society, politics and culture. Topics include: theories relating communications to social organization; political economy of information and media; power, privacy, equity, access, gender, emergent cultures/ identity in cyberspace; changing knowledge and learning in an age of convergent communications.

Antirequisite(s): The former MIT 2371F/G.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Extra Information: 1-3 hour screening, 2 lecture/seminar hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Extra Information: 1-3 hour screening, 2 lecture/seminar hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Extra Information: 1-3 hour screening, 2 lecture/seminar hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Extra Information: 1-3 hour screening, 2 lecture/seminar hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Extra Information: 1-3 hour screening, 2 lecture/seminar hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Extra Information: 1-3 hour screening, 2 lecture/seminar hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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As a prominent Canadian journalist once observed, the tabloids will always be with us. This course will take an in depth examination of the phenomenon of sensationalism and propaganda from its birth in the late 18th century to the peak of its power at the turn of the 20th century.

Antirequisite(s): MIT 3442G if taken in 2011-2012, 2012-2013 or 2013-2014.

Extra Information:3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course teaches students to write and interpret more complex pieces of journalism from a variety of sources. Students will study different styles of feature writing, from the point of view of both a consumer of news and a journalist. Students will also pitch story ideas and practice turning their ideas into engaging features.

Antirequisite(s): MIT 3870G if taken in 2009-10, 2010-11 or 2011-12 or Writing 2203F/G.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course will look at a variety of journalistic writing, from hard-news stories written on deadline to opinion writing to stories with attitude. The stories will be examined in several ways - as products of the news-media system, as sources of information and as the first rough draft of history. Students will also get an opportunity to practice journalistic writing.

Antirequisite(s): Registration in the Journalism - Broadcast stream of the MTP Program.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Explores the relationship between media, documentary, and representation. Using cultural and media theory, we will explore 'documentary' practice in cinema, performance, photography, the museum, oral history, print, and digital media. Students apply critical readings to produce and critique one (or two) small documentary projects. No production experience expected.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course aims to give students an overview of the types of stories written by an arts journalist working for a newspaper or website, such as reviews, columns, features, and profiles. The course will consider solutions to problems specific to arts journalism and will examine ethical questions peculiar to arts journalism.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course explores the nature of television programming and identifies correlations between ideology and consumption. It will not only consider what our parents and grandparents watched, it will focus on the nature of "media nesting" in the 21st century. What are the anthropological roots of "comfort television"? How does it respond to communal anxiety and how does it affect subsequent political and economic consumer choices.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Activists often consider corporate or state owned media unfriendly terrain. But such media can provide a crucial way to 'get the message out'. Using the ideas of experienced media activists, and examples from the practice of today's social movements, this course investigates how to win the battle for public opinion in mainstream media.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course examines the definition, history, theory and practice of 'alternative' media, and its differences from and relationship to 'mainstream' corporate and state supported media. These issues are explored across a variety of media to critically assess the possibilities and limits of alternative media in enriching cultural diversity and democratic practice.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course explores the intersections between media studies and genocide studies, particularly the role of media and communication in the perpetration, prevention and memorialization of genocide and other state-sponsored atrocities. We will examine several case studies, with an emphasis on the Holocaust, the Rwandan genocide and the crisis in Darfur.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course explores the relation between food, media, and social justice. You will learn about corporate/industrial and alternative models of food production, and then you will use your critical and creative skills to respond to what you've learned. Themes include genetic modification, factory farming, body image, animal welfare, technology and ethics, globalization, and alternative or grassroots responses.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 2 hour film screening.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course will explore the history of student activism from the medieval period to the present, with a specific focus on the past 100 years in Europe and North America. We will look at the roots of student organization and dissent in the university itself, and will exam impact of student agitation and resistance on broader movements for social change, such as anti-war, civil rights and labor movements. We will examine strategies and tactics of student movements, and debate the usefulness of student resistance in furthering the public interest.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Recently, popular discourse on the digital revolution, and its facilitation of a colour-blind future, has been undermined by more sensible debates over the connections between race and technology. This course will not only explore those connections, but investigate issues related to socio-economic and racial exploitation under contemporary capitalism.

Antirequisite(s): The former MIT 2510F/G.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course examines journalism and the local conditions that enable progressive social change, as well as those that constrain it. Case studies from the Middle East, China and Africa may be reviewed. Students will also gain an understanding of the role media plays in the process of globalization.

Antirequisite(s): MIT 3437F/G if taken in 2010-11, 2011-2012, 2012-2013 or 2013-2014.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Students will, in consultation with a full-time faculty member in FIMS who has agreed to act as supervisor, develop an appropriate plan of study, do the research and complete the writing of a 50-page paper, or equivalent, that connects work done in the field during the completion of MIT 3990F/G and/or MIT 3991F/G, with ideas or themes critical to Media and the Public Interest. Permission of the Faculty is required.

Antirequisite(s): MIT 3951F/G.

Prerequisite(s): The student must find a full-time FIMS faculty member willing to supervise. Corequisite(s): MIT 3990F/G and/or MIT 3991F/G.

Course Weight: 1.00
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Students will, in consultation with a full-time faculty member in FIMS who has agreed to act as supervisor, develop an appropriate plan of study, do the research and complete the writing of a 50-page paper, or equivalent, that connects work done in the field during the completion of MIT 3990F/G and/or MIT 3991F/G, with ideas or themes critical to Media and the Public Interest. Permission of the Faculty is required.

Antirequisite(s): MIT 3950E.

Prerequisite(s): The student must find a full-time FIMS faculty member willing to supervise. Corequisite(s): MIT 3990F/G and/or MIT 3991F/G.

Course Weight: 0.50
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The MPI Academic Internship I places undergraduate students in unpaid positions where they work in a new and challenging cultural milieu for community groups, non-government organizations and public services with media- and information- related interests. Placements are selected and supervised by instructors in consultation with the Undergraduate Affairs Committee.

Antirequisite(s): MIT 3090F/G/Z, MIT 3091F/G/Z.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in the 3rd or 4th year of a module in MPI, with a min cum average of 72%, no failures or documented academic offences. Approval of, and acceptance into, an internship placement. Corequisite(s): MIT 3950E or MIT 3951F/G.

Extra Information: The internship is given 0.5 course credit, and will show on the student's transcript as Pass with Distinction, Pass, or Fail.

Course Weight: 0.50
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The MPI Academic Internship II places undergraduate students in unpaid positions where they work in a new and challenging cultural milieu for community groups, non-government organizations and public services with media- and information- related interests. Placements are selected and supervised by instructors in consultation with the Undergraduate Affairs Committee.

Antirequisite(s): MIT 3090F/G/Z, MIT 3091F/G/Z.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in the 3rd or 4th year of a module in MPI, with a min cum average of 72%, no failures or documented academic offences. Approval of, and acceptance into, an internship placement. Corequisite(s): MIT 3950E or MIT 3951F/G.

Extra Information: The internship is given 0.5 course credit, and will show on the student's transcript as Pass with Distinction, Pass, or Fail.

Course Weight: 0.50
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The subject of an Advanced Directed Readings course will be selected by a student in consultation with a full-time faculty member willing to direct the course. Registration in the fourth year of an MIT program is required. Permission of the Faculty is required.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in the fourth year of an MIT program and permission of the Faculty.

Course Weight: 1.00
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The subject of an Advanced Directed Readings course will be selected by a student in consultation with a full-time faculty member willing to direct the course. Registration in the fourth year of an MIT program is required. Permission of the Faculty is required.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in the fourth year of an MIT program and permission of the Faculty.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Students may be required to do in-depth projects and/or seminar presentations in the senior Special Topics courses.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in fourth year of an Honors Specialization module in FIMS, or permission of the instructor. Note: Enrolment is based on a ballot system which is submitted prior to course registration.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Students may be required to do in-depth projects and/or seminar presentations in the senior Special Topics courses.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in fourth year of an Honors Specialization module in FIMS, or permission of the instructor. Note: Enrolment is based on a ballot system which is submitted prior to course registration.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Students may be required to do in-depth projects and/or seminar presentations in the senior Special Topics courses.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in fourth year of an Honors Specialization module in FIMS, or permission of the instructor. Note: Enrolment is based on a ballot system which is submitted prior to course registration.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Students may be required to do in-depth projects and/or seminar presentations in the senior Special Topics courses.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in fourth year of an Honors Specialization module in FIMS, or permission of the instructor. Note: Enrolment is based on a ballot system which is submitted prior to course registration.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Students may be required to do in-depth projects and/or seminar presentations in the senior Special Topics courses.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in fourth year of an Honors Specialization module in FIMS, or permission of the instructor. Note: Enrolment is based on a ballot system which is submitted prior to course registration.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Students may be required to do in-depth projects and/or seminar presentations in the senior Special Topics courses.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in fourth year of an Honors Specialization module in FIMS, or permission of the instructor. Note: Enrolment is based on a ballot system which is submitted prior to course registration.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Students may be required to do in-depth projects and/or seminar presentations in the senior Special Topics courses.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in fourth year of an Honors Specialization module in FIMS, or permission of the instructor. Note: Enrolment is based on a ballot system which is submitted prior to course registration.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Students may be required to do in-depth projects and/or seminar presentations in the senior Special Topics courses.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in fourth year of an Honors Specialization module in FIMS, or permission of the instructor. Note: Enrolment is based on a ballot system which is submitted prior to course registration.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Students may be required to do in-depth projects and/or seminar presentations in the senior Special Topics courses.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in fourth year of an Honors Specialization module in FIMS, or permission of the instructor. Note: Enrolment is based on a ballot system which is submitted prior to course registration.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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Students may be required to do in-depth projects and/or seminar presentations in the senior Special Topics courses.

Prerequisite(s): Registration in fourth year of an Honors Specialization module in FIMS, or permission of the instructor. Note: Enrolment is based on a ballot system which is submitted prior to course registration.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course combines work in the field of public interest media, participation in a special seminar and theoretically informed paper or project based on the practicum experience.

Prerequisite(s): Restricted to students in the fourth year of a module in Media and the Public Interest

Extra Information: A maximum of 15 hours of class time and a minimum of 40 hours placement. The MPI Practicum will be evaluated on a Pass/Fail basis with the option of a Pass with Distinction.

Course Weight: 0.50
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