Academic Calendar - 2018

Western University Academic Calendar. - 2018

Courses


Course Numbering

0001-0999* Pre-University level introductory courses
1000-1999 Year 1 courses
2000-4999 Senior-level undergraduate courses
5000-5999 Professional Degree courses in Dentistry, Education, Law, Medicine and Theology (MTS, MDiv)
6000-6999 Courses offered by Continuing Studies
9000-9999 Graduate Studies courses

* These courses are equivalent to pre-university introductory courses and may be counted for credit in the student's record, unless these courses were taken in a preliminary year. They may not be counted toward essay or breadth requirements, or used to meet modular admission requirements unless it is explicitly stated in the Senate-approved outline of the module.


Suffixes

no suffix 1.0 course not designated as an essay course
A 0.5 course offered in first term
B 0.5 course offered in second term
A/B 0.5 course offered in first and/or second term
E 1.0 essay course
F 0.5 essay course offered in first term
G 0.5 essay course offered in second term
F/G 0.5 essay course offered in first and/or second term
H 1.0 accelerated course (8 weeks)
J 1.0 accelerated course (6 weeks)
K 0.75 course
L 0.5 graduate course offered in summer term (May - August)
Q/R/S/T 0.25 course offered within a regular session
U 0.25 course offered in other than a regular session
W/X 1.0 accelerated course (full course offered in one term)
Y 0.5 course offered in other than a regular session
Z 0.5 essay course offered in other than a regular session

Glossary


Prerequisite

A course that must be successfully completed prior to registration for credit in the desired course.


Corequisite

A course that must be taken concurrently with (or prior to registration in) the desired course.


Antirequisite

Courses that overlap sufficiently in course content that both cannot be taken for credit.


Essay Courses

Many courses at Western have a significant writing component. To recognize student achievement, a number of such courses have been designated as essay courses and will be identified on the student's record (E essay full course; F/G/Z essay half-course).


Principal Courses

A first year course that is listed by a department offering a module as a requirement for admission to the module. For admission to an Honors Specialization module or Double Major modules in an Honors Bachelor degree, at least 3.0 courses will be considered principal courses.



Campus





Course Level






Course Type




Digital Communication


A study of the principles and production of social media through which students will gain an understanding of online information architecture and organization. Students will learn the techniques and critical skills required for creating and managing content on a variety of platforms including, but not limited to, web sites, blogs, twitter, and Facebook.

Extra Information: 3 hours

Course Weight: 0.50
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A study of principles and production through which students will gain an understanding of theoretical and practical applications of virtual worlds and simulation spaces. Students will learn the techniques and critical skills required for creating and managing communities, identities and interactivity in virtual and online worlds.

Extra Information: 3 hours

Course Weight: 0.50
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In today's online environment, social networking sites (SNSs) have altered the social landscape. Students will become fluent in the theoretical and practical aspects of social networking, in addition to understanding its contexts and social issues such as bullying, anonymity, addiction, anxiety, and narcissism. This course will introduce the conceptual tools required to carry out a group work component.

Antirequisite(s): The former MIT 2374F/G, MIT 3375F/G.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course focuses on the design and production of information for websites. While learning the basics of information architecture and usability, students will also discover how to use XHTML and CSS for the creation of static websites. Key concepts in digital imaging, such as image compression will also be introduced.

Antirequisite(s): MIT 2570A/B, Registration in the MTP Program.

Extra Information: 1 lecture hour, 3 laboratory hours

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course introduces the student to the concepts of visual literacy. Study concentrates on the elements and principles of basic two dimensional designs, visual communication and its objective theoretical application. Current industry standard vector-based, bitmap-based and presentation software applications are introduced to allow the student to practice and exercise visual literacy. Emphasis will be fall on the professional and applied applications of this topic.

Antirequisite(s): MIT 2600A/B, Registration in the MTP Program.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours

Course Weight: 0.50
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Information searching and its relationship to the design of search technologies. Theory and practice of retrieval from commercial databases; Web search engine design; the implications of ranking algorithms and recommender systems; open-source and proprietary search technologies. Emerging search functionalities based on multimedia, natural language processing and social software. Emphasis will be fall on the professional and applied applications of this topic.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours

Course Weight: 0.50
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The course will examine how search engines are built, how they work, and how to evaluate them. The course will introduce basic concepts and techniques of Web data mining including Web hyperlink analysis, Web traffic analysis and Web server log analysis. Emphasis will be fall on the professional and applied applications of this topic.

Extra Information: 2 lecture hours, 1 laboratory hour.

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course will explore the impact that User-Generated Content, Social Networks have had on contemporary conceptions of labour and work. Through the lens of Autonomist Marxism and related theory, the course will consider the changes taking place in labour processes and the products being produced by this shift to immaterial work. Emphasis will be on the professional and applied applications of this topic, with special attention payed to ethics of and exploitation within knowledge work and digital labour.

Antirequisite(s): MIT 3133F/G.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours

Course Weight: 0.50
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Video games have a profound influence on popular culture, digital technology, and the entertainment industry. This course examines the fundamentals of video games, their role in culture and society, how they are used for different ends, and the benefits and concerns associated with their use.

Antirequisite(s): MIT 3371F/G.


Extra Information: 3 lecture hours

Course Weight: 0.50
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Digital games can have a powerful influence on the human mind. This course deals with the design and analysis of digital games from a cognitive perspective. It examines why design is important, that is, how it can promote shallow thinking, or vice-versa support mindful reasoning and higher-order thinking. Emphasis will be fall on the professional and applied applications of this topic.

Antirequisite(s): MIT 3372A/B.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course investigates the term social networking and its related theories. We will examine various platforms and the social consequences these have had for our understanding of friendship, work, and privacy. The focus is on the methodological approaches. Emphasis will fall on the professional and applied applications of this topic.

Antirequisite(s): MIT 3374F/G.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours

Course Weight: 0.50
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This course provides hands-on experience with building, evaluating, and using social media tools such as blogs, wikis, and social networking websites within an organizational context. Relevant issues such as user privacy, social media policies, effective planning and implementation, and organizational impact will be addressed. Emphasis will be fall on the professional and applied applications of this topic.

Antirequisite(s): MIT 3373F/G.

Extra Information: 3 lecture hours

Course Weight: 0.50
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What does it mean to live and operate within the creativity of your and others' imaginations? This course examines this and other questions within Virtual Worlds, critically and productively, as they pertain to various theoretical and applied professional uses of these worlds. Emphasis is on inworld projects and critiques.

Antirequisite(s): MIT 3653G if taken in 2011-2012.

Extra Information: 3 lecture/lab hours.

Course Weight: 0.50
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